[Homeroast] From today's New York Times

Barbara C. Greenspon lilysownahmah at greensponassociates.com
Mon May 11 09:11:57 CDT 2015


A friend just sent these excerpts from this article on the New York Times:  "More Consensus on Coffee's Benefits Than You Might Think.”

Hurray for us!

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> The author is Aaron E. Carroll, professor of pediatrics at Indiana University School of Medicine.
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> 
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> [begin excerpts]
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> Coffee has long had a reputation as being unhealthy. But in almost every single respect that reputation is backward.
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> The potential health benefits are surprisingly large.
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> <snip>
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> Just last year, a systematic review and meta-analysis of studies looking at long-term consumption of coffee and the risk of cardiovascular disease was published.
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> The researchers found 36 studies involving more than 1,270,000 participants.
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> The combined data showed that those who consumed a moderate amount of coffee, about three to five cups a day, were at the lowest risk for problems.
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> Those who consumed five or more cups a day had no higher risk than those who consumed none.
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> Of course, everything I'm saying here concerns coffee -- black coffee. I am not talking about the mostly milk and sugar coffee-based beverages that lots of people consume.
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> <snip>
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> Years earlier, a meta-analysis was published looking at how coffee consumption might be associated with stroke.
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> Eleven studies were found, including almost 480,000 participants. As with the prior studies, consumption of two to six cups of coffee a day was associated with a lower risk of disease, compared with those who drank none.
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> Another meta-analysis published a year later confirmed these findings.
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> Rounding out concerns about the effect of coffee on your heart, another meta-analysis examined how drinking coffee might be associated with heart failure.
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> Again, moderate consumption was associated with a lower risk, with the lowest risk among those who consumed four servings a day.
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> Consumption had to get up to about 10 cups a day before any bad associations were seen.
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> <snip>
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> A meta-analysis published in 2007 found that increasing coffee consumption by two cups a day was associated with a lower relative risk of liver cancer by more than 40 percent.
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> Two more recent studies confirmed these findings.
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> <snip>
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> The same holds true for breast cancer...
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> <snip>
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> A study looking at all cancers suggested that it might be associated with reduced overall cancer incidence and that the more you drank, the more protection was seen.
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> Drinking coffee is associated with better laboratory values in those at risk for liver disease.
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> In patients who already have liver disease, it's associated with a decreased progression to cirrhosis.
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> In patients who already have cirrhosis, it's associated with a lower risk of death and a lower risk of developing liver cancer.
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> It's associated with improved responses to antiviral therapy in patients with hepatitis C and better outcomes in patients with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease.
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> The authors of the systematic review argue that daily coffee consumption should be encouraged in patients with chronic liver disease.
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> The most recent meta-analyses on neurological disorders found that coffee intake was associated with lower risks of Parkinson's disease, lower cognitive decline and a potential protective effect against Alzheimer's disease (but certainly no harm).
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> <snip>
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> A systematic review published in 2005 found that regular coffee consumption was associated with a significantly reduced risk of developing Type 2 diabetes, with the lowest relative risks (about a third reduction) seen in those who drank at least six or seven cups a day.
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> The latest study, published in 2014, used updated data and included 28 studies and more than 1.1 million participants.
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> Again, the more coffee you drank, the less likely you were to have diabetes.
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> <snip>
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> Is coffee associated with the risk of death from all causes?
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> There have been two meta-analyses published within the last year or so.
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> The first reviewed 20 studies, including almost a million people, and the second included 17 studies containing more than a million people.
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> Both found that drinking coffee was associated with a significantly reduced chance of death.
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> I can't think of any other product that has this much positive epidemiologic evidence going for it.
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> <snip>
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> If any other modifiable risk factor had these kind of positive associations across the board, the media would be all over it.
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> We'd be pushing it on everyone.
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> Whole interventions would be built up around it.
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> <snip>
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> But it's way past time that we stopped viewing coffee as something we all need to cut back on. It's a completely reasonable addition to a healthy diet, with more potential benefits seen in research than almost any other beverage we're consuming. It's time we started treating it as such.
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> [end excerpts]



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