[Homeroast] post roast gases

John Nordling john.nordling at gmail.com
Wed Mar 12 20:19:39 CDT 2014


Ken,

I think that if you want to do that, it's a great idea.  I would recommend
roasting well into second crack, a dark espresso roast maybe.  Here's why:

I live in MN, and it gets cold here in the winter (disgustingly cold).  A
couple years ago, I way overshot my roasting end point on a batch (I
typically try to stay just short of second crack), but apart from being
really dark, they seemed okay, but you know - greasy.

A Spaniard friend of mine likes really dark roast, so I offered it up to
him.  I threw the beans in a plastic bag, and tossed it on the front seat
of my car in December.  When I took the bag out, I realized there was a
waxy layer on everything - that second crack releases coffee oils in ways
that first crack doesn't.  just in the palm of my hand, the bag went back
to clear from the oil thinning out again.  He liked them, I didn't.

My point is that what it sounds like you're trying to do is get the oils
out of the coffee and into a wooden bowl to stain it.  (I feel like I've
seen coffee stained stuff before, but I think it was done by soaking the
object in brewed coffee for a few days.)  I'd let the bowl (or even a
sanded piece of scrap if you don't want to risk a freshly turned bowl) sit
buried in the beans for a week or more, stirring it every day to try to get
something resembling even exposure (check daily to see what's developing?).


That was a really roundabout way to get to my point.  If you've stayed with
me this far, congratulations.  I'm pretty sure I nodded off a paragraph
ago.  Probably I didn't tell you all anything you didn't already know, but
for a first post to the list, I think I did okay.

-John

~~
"Can't believe how strange it is to be anything at all."   Neutral Milk
Hotel, *In the Aeroplane Over the Sea*

Email:  john.nordling at gmail.com


On Wed, Mar 12, 2014 at 8:02 PM, Ben Treichel <btreichel at gmail.com> wrote:

> Try it like a coffee rub to make it go faster!
>  On Mar 12, 2014 4:49 PM, "Andy Thomas" <adt0611 at yahoo.com> wrote:
>
> > Just a guess, but I think it may be from oils in the beans that atomize
> > during the grinding process. It would only be a very tiny bit, but over
> > time it might build up enough to create a patina on the lid. I can't see
> or
> > feel anything on the lid of my grinder, but I have only had it for less
> > than a year. You could try putting it through the dishwasher; it might
> get
> > clean; it might not get clean; it might melt.
> >
> > As for your woodworking experiment, I think it is worth a try, Coffee
> oils
> > do become rancid, but so do other non-mineral oils that are used for wood
> > -- linseed, teak, etc. Why not do a trial with a piece of scrap. You
> could
> > try with whole beans and different grinds from fine to coarse.
> >
> >
> >
> >
> > ________________________________
> >  From: kevin creason <ckevinj at gmail.com>
> > To: Homeroast <homeroast at lists.sweetmariascoffee.com>
> > Sent: Tuesday, March 11, 2014 2:57 PM
> > Subject: [Homeroast] post roast gases
> >
> >
> > About six years ago I picked up some nice professional equipment: a nice
> > Rancillio S24 espresso machine and Maestre espresso grinder. I love them.
> > The grinder did not come with a lid for the hopper, but a tupperware lid
> > fit so I used that. Much to my wife's chagrin, I should add.
> >
> > Fast forward to the point at hand... This lid is now totally ruined for
> > going back to its previous duties. It is so discolored by coffee that I
> > would face equal wrath at returning it now.
> > Oops.
> > The lid just sits up on top of the hopper -- it does not come in direct
> > contact with the beans or grounds. I suppose there could be some minute
> > fly-off of grounds when the beans are emptied out to the bottom. But I
> find
> > that scenario a little hard to believe. I think instead that it must be
> > gases from freshly roast coffee that rise and permeate the plastic.
> > Is this possible? Has anyone else observed this?
> >
> > My next question is using this potential phenomenon to my advantage, or
> at
> > least confirming it through additional observation. When I'm not roasting
> > and consuming coffee, or working my typing fingers to the bone on some
> > remote command line somewhere, I like to turn wood into round objects on
> my
> > lathe. I've been pondering buying cheap beans that I would not deign to
> > consume, but instead stuff a wood bowl or pen into a baggy of said
> freshly
> > roasted crappy beans and see what the wood absorbs from the beans. It
> might
> > be pretty, it might be ugly.
> > The first concern is that the wood would turn rancid after a while. But
> > sealing it in acrylic might solve that issue.
> > What do you think?
> >
> >
> > -Kevin
> > /*" I am looking for a lot of men who have an infinite capacity to not
> know
> > what can't be done. " -- Henry Ford  */
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