[Homeroast] Light vs. dark espresso roasts.

gin powell pchforever at gmail.com
Thu Mar 13 09:48:47 CDT 2014


hello john:

as a home roaster, a roasting forum administrator, and espresso/cafe crema
lover I believe that any roast you like is what you should use/brew for
your espresso.

it, for me, clearly depends on the bean. what brings out the best or your
wanted flavor from that bean? it could be a lighter roast. I use every bean
I roast as an espresso/cafe crema and I drink great espresso.

whatever "the roast of the moment" is for coffee hustlers/charbucks etc I
simply consider ho hum, who cares.

I drink the best of what coffee is grown worldwide and roast to my taste. I
never roast way into 2nd crack any longer, not necessary to bring up the
best of a bean, in my opinion.

ginny

rock on John



On Wed, Mar 12, 2014 at 7:40 PM, Danny Goot <dannygoot at gmail.com> wrote:

> Brother John,
>
> There is truth in your words. Coffee has seen its light and dark days come
> and go. What is around the corner is a happy medium roast. I am a coffee
> pro and home roaster that has seen the trends dictate roasters far and
> near.
>
> Another reason to roast the oils out is to creat consistency. It's so much
> easier to maintain a consistant cup when you take it to the limit.
>
> You can BBQ the bejesus out of old rotting  meat an serve it to those who
> will eat it.
>
> Hey, I like both. Just like I having options between pilsner, IPA and
> stouts.
>
> Rock on brother John!
>
> On Wednesday, March 12, 2014, John M. Howison <johnmhowison at gmail.com>
> wrote:
>
> > To an elderly home roaster who makes coffee in 190-degree water rather
> > than an espresso device,  the recent posts in favor of lighter
> > espresso roasts has been interesting.  Having been a coffee enthusiast
> > long before espresso machines were at hand, I firmly believe that dark
> > roasts have been tolerated unduly because over-roasting suppresses
> > faults, and despite the necessary  diadvantage of suppressing virtues
> > at the same time.  Way back when travelers to Europe were extolling
> > Viennese coffee rather than Roman -- when Viennese roasters paid
> > higher prices than anyone else for premium beans -- ideal roasts
> > tended to hover in the "no oiliness" neighborhood.  Are we now
> > rediscovering what some folks knew a long time ago?
> >
> > --
> > Contra muros, mater rubicolla
> >
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