[Homeroast] from scratch roaster project

John Nanci john at chocolatealchemy.com
Thu Feb 28 07:39:16 CST 2013


I'm currently roasting with my third iteration of 
a from scratch 110 V electric roaster.  1 lb is 
no where close to marginal.  I do 1 lb week in, 
week out (12-13 minute roast).  1.5 lbs  on 
occasion (15-16 minutes) and have gone full out 
with 2 lbs and still was under 20 
minutes.  Granted 20 amps, but 15 amps will still 
do 1 lb without flinching....if you design right :)

I've had my best luck with small 'habatchi' style 
heater coils.  Very durable, consistent, 
cheap.  Nichrome as much as I want to love it 
seems to burn through on me (note to self - check about larger gauge).

As for a draw fan - I'm going to suggest pulling 
the heat still.  If you push the air, it (and 
smoke) is going to exit everywhere you don't have 
good seals.  EVERYWHERE.  With pulling it's only 
where you want it.  As for heat proof, since you 
are building from scratch, I suggest any old 
small motor.  C frames are great.  Extend the 
shaft, mount a metal impeller wheel, and away you 
go.  Instant heat proof fan.  If you want it 
REALLY heat proof, don't directly mount the 
impeller shaft to the motor, but drive it via a 
gear or pulley.  No heat transfer at all that way.

Have fun!

John Nanci,
Alchemist at large

At 08:51 PM 2/27/2013, you wrote:
>The last electric dryer I tore into had a 4" diameter tube with a fan &
>heating element in it. Also a couple of overtemp switches for safety. It'd
>be a nice assembly to build a roaster around.
>
>Yes, it is 220V but to my way of thinking a 120V outlet is marginal for a 1
>lb or greater roaster.
>
>*"**You risk the most if you don't risk anything."*
>— Jean-Claude Juncker
>
>
>On Wed, Feb 27, 2013 at 5:09 PM, Ira <ira at extrasensory.com> wrote:
>
> > At 07:01 AM 2/27/2013, you wrote:
> >
> >> I have a friend who has programming experience that would like to build a
> >> > roaster from scratch.  I have 2 questions for anyone that has built an
> >> > electric roaster from scratch. What could I use for an element? And,
> >> what
> >> > could I use for an exhaust fan that would be able to handle the heat of
> >> the
> >> > roaster exhaust.
> >>
> >
> > Blow in so the fan doesn't see heat.  Look at thrift stores for toaster
> > ovens with rod elements if you want radiant heat or maybe abandoned
> > electric dryers if you can use 220.
> >
> > Ira
> >
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