[Homeroast] OT: Re: Mailing List hacks

Michael Wascher wascher at gmail.com
Wed Sep 5 09:12:31 CDT 2012


Andy,

It may not be such an amateurish attempt. Remember, the scammers are
looking for non-technical & gullible people, and they have an enormous
pool from which to choose. What better way than to let the possible
targets self-select?

How is this done? Keep the attempt amateurish, put in a few
misspellings & grammatical errors, don't hide the screwy links. If
anybody does reply they're probably a good target for the scam. And
the scammer can concentrate on just those few people.

It is all about knowing & targeting your customer.


What you did earlier was the best thing you could have done. Warn
people, as soon as possible. There are people out there who won't
notice that there are issues. BTW, there are people who, even with
your warning, will get scammed. And some of them will blame you.

--MikeW

“Greetings, my friend. We are all interested in the future, for that
is where you and I are going to spend the rest of our lives. And
remember my friend, future events such as these will affect you in the
future.” -- Criswell, Plan 9 from Outer Space


On Tue, Sep 4, 2012 at 11:11 PM, Andy Thomas <adt0611 at yahoo.com> wrote:
> As it turns out, I was probably not hacked. Someone I know received a spam email using my name, but it was not even sent from my account. Probably just an amateur attempt at phishing, and no harm done, as far as I know. I certainly didn't suspect this list or anyone on it; I just didn't want any of you good people to get caught if it had turned out to be a serious attack.
>
>
> Andy
>
>
>
> ________________________________
>  From: Mike Davis <mldavis2 at sbcglobal.net>
> To: homeroast at lists.sweetmariascoffee.com
> Sent: Tuesday, September 4, 2012 1:42 PM
> Subject: [Homeroast] Mailing List hacks
>
> No e-mails here with Andy's return address, so Sweet Maria's list is OK and not likely a source of the problem.
>
> As a further comment, very often a spammer will obtain an e-mail address from someone else's contact list on an improperly protected computer - someone with your address in their list.  This has happened to me when some old e-mail addresses were "stolen" from a long-unused contact list at Yahoo.  The spammers then used my e-mail address to spam other people by showing the origin of the spam to be my e-mail.  (I suspect the origin of the contact list because one person's e-mail 'bounced' back to me as undeliverable - a person who was only on that list and who had died a number of years ago.) There is no solution to this kind of 'theft' and spamming since many of these servers are off-shore, the 'crime' is not worth law enforcement pursuit, and our laws do not apply outside of our country.  The only thing you can do is judicious use of the delete key and make sure your own anti-virus programs, firewalls and routers block thieves.
>
> Andy need not apologize, as it is very unlikely his fault, and most certainly not SM.
>
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