[Homeroast] Fwd: UCLA Study on Alzheimer's

Steven Shonk steven_shonk at yahoo.com
Thu Jul 21 15:18:30 CDT 2011


Danny, at the bottom of the article is the following:

Excerpted from Jean Carper's newest book:
> "100 Simple Things You Can Do to Prevent Alzheimer's"




----- Original Message -----
From: Danny Gutierrez <danny at engagecoffee.com>
To: "A list to discuss home coffee roasting. There are rules for this list, available at http://www.sweetmarias.com/maillistinfo.html" <homeroast at lists.sweetmariascoffee.com>
Cc: 
Sent: Thursday, July 21, 2011 10:47 AM
Subject: Re: [Homeroast] Fwd: UCLA Study on Alzheimer's

Is there a website where you pulled this info from?


On Thu, Jul 21, 2011 at 8:24 AM, Barry Luterman <lutermanb at gmail.com> wrote:

> Came across this. don't know how valid it is but I think the list members
> are probably a safe group.
>
> ---------- Forwarded message ----------
> From: dmluterman <dmluterman at aol.com>
> Date: Thu, Jul 21, 2011 at 7:52 AM
> Subject: Fwd: UCLA Study on Alzheimer's
> To: scolten2 at nyc.rr.com, linda.dolmatch at verizon.net,
> dennydougherty at comcast.net, Jrgaud <jrgaud at aol.com>, geolebr4 at aol.com,
> sandra_cohn_thau at emerson.edu, lynn_conners at emerson.edu, weiss at hawaii.edu,
> mark.ross at uconn.edu, panishc at bellsouth.net, lpreble3 at comcast.net,
> kayd505 at yahoo.com, lutermanb at gmail.com, asimpy at gmail.com
>
>
>
>
>
> ---------- Forwarded message ----------
> From: lpreble3 at comcast.net
> To:
> Date: Wed, 20 Jul 2011 23:18:03 -0400
> Subject: Fwd: UCLA Study on Alzheimer's
>
>
> Leverett L. Preble III
> 28 Wainwright Rd
> Winchester MA
> 01890
> (781)729-6437
>
> ------------------------------
> *From: *"Michael A. Carpinella" <mikecarpinella at comcast.net>
> *To: *"Michael A. Carpinella" <mikecarpinella at comcast.net>
> *Sent: *Tuesday, July 19, 2011 9:11:35 AM
> *Subject: *FW: UCLA Study on Alzheimer's
>
>
>
>
>
> *From:* Ruth Carpinella [mailto:ruthcarp at comcast.net]
> *Sent:* Monday, July 18, 2011 7:52 PM
> *To:* Undisclosed-Recipient:;
> *Subject:* Fw: UCLA Study on Alzheimer's
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>  ------------------------------
>
>
>
> *UCLA Study on Alzheimers*
>
>
> *Food for Thought*
>
> *"The idea that Alzheimer's is entirely genetic and unpreventable is
> perhaps
> the
> greatest misconception about the disease," says Gary Small, M.D., director
> of
> the UCLA Center on Aging.* Researchers now know that Alzheimer's, like
> heart
>
> disease and cancer, develops over decades and can be influenced by
> lifestyle
>
> factors including cholesterol, blood pressure, obesity, depression,
> education,
> nutrition, sleep and mental, physical and social activity.
> *
> **The big news: Mountains of research reveals that simple things you do
> every day might cut your odds of losing your mind to Alzheimer 's. *
>
> In search of scientific ways to delay and outlive Alzheimer's and other
> dementias, I tracked down thousands of studies and interviewed dozens of
> experts. The results in a new book: *100 Simple Things You Can Do to
> Prevent Alzheimer's and Age-Related Memory Loss* (Little, Brown; $19.99).
> *Here are 10 strategies I found most surprising.
> *
> 1.  *Have coffee*. In an amazing flip-flop, coffee is the new brain tonic.
> A
> large
> European study showed that drinking three to five cups of coffee a day in
> midlife cut Alzheimer's risk 65% in late life. University of South Florida
> researcher Gary Arendash credits caffeine: He says it reduces
> dementia-causing amyloid in animal brains. Others credit coffee's
> antioxidants. So drink up, Arendash advises, unless your doctor says you
> shouldn't.
>
> 2.  *Floss*. Oddly, the health of your teeth and gum s can help predict
> dementia. University of Southern California research found that having
> periodontal disease before age 35 quadrupled the odds of dementia years
> later. Older people with tooth and gum disease score lower on memory and
> cognition tests, other studies show. Experts speculate that inflammation in
> diseased mouths migrates to the brain.
>
> 3.*Google*. Doing an online search can stimulate your aging brain even more
> than reading a book, says UCLA's Gary Small, who used brain MRIs to prove
> it. The biggest surprise: Novice Internet surfers, ages 55 to 78, activated
> key memory and learning centers in the brain after only a week of Web
> surfing for an hour a day.
>
> 4. *Grow new brain cells*. Impossible, scientists used to say. Now it's
> believed that thousands of brain cells are born daily. The trick is to keep
> the newborns
> alive. What works: aerobic exercise (such as a brisk 30-minute walk every
> day), strenuous mental activity, eating salmon and other fatty fish, and
> avoiding obesity, chronic stress, sleep deprivation, heavy drinking and
> vitamin B deficiency.
>
> 5. *Drink apple juice*. Apple juice can push production of the "memory
> chemical" acetylcholine; that's the way the popular Alzheimer's drug
> Aricept
> works, says
> Thomas Shea, Ph.D., of the University of Massachusetts . He was surprised
> that old mice given apple juice did better on learning and memory tests
> than
> mice that received water. A dose for humans: 16 ounces, or two to three
> apples a day.
>
> 6. *Protect your head*. Blows to the head, even mild ones early in life,
> increase odds of dementia years later. Pro football players have 19 times
> the typical rate of memory-related diseases. Alzheimer's is four times more
> common in elderly who suffer a head injury, Columbia University finds.
> Accidental falls doubled an older person's odds of dementia five years
> later
> in another study. Wear seat belts and helmets, fall-proof your house, and
> don't take risks.
>
> 7. *Meditate*. Brain scans show that people who meditate regularly have
> less
> cognitive decline and brain shrinkage - a classic sign of Alzheimer's - as
> they age. Andrew Newberg of the University of Pennsylvania School of
> Medicine says yoga meditation of 12 minutes a day for two months improved
> blood flow and cognitive functioning in seniors with memory problems.
>
> 8. *Take D*. A "severe deficiency" of vitamin D boosts older Americans'
> risk
> of
> cognitive impairment 394%, an alarming study by England 's University of
> Exeter finds. And most Americans lack vitamin D. Experts recommend a daily
> dose of 800 IU to 2,000 IU of vitamin D3.
>
> 9. *Fill your brain*. It < <http://brain.it/>http://brain.it/%3E; 's
> called
> "cognitive reserve." A rich ac cumulation of life experiences - education,
> marriage, socializing, a stimulating job, language skills, having a purpose
> in life, physical activity and mentally demanding leisure activities -
> makes
> your brain better able to tolerate plaques and tangles. You can even have
> significant Alzheimer's pathology and no symptoms of dementia if you have
> high cognitive reserve, says David Bennett, M.D., of Chicago 's Rush
> University Medical Center .
>
> 10. *Avoid infection*. Astonishing new evidence ties Alzheimer's to cold
> sores, gastric ulcers, Lyme disease, pneumonia and the flu. Ruth Itzhaki,
> Ph.D., of the University of Manchester in England estimates the cold-sore
> herpes simplex virus is incriminated in 60% of Alzheimer's cases. The
> theory: Infections trigger excessive beta amyloid "gunk" that kills brain
> cells. Proof is still lacking, but why not avoid common infections and take
> appropriate vaccines, antibiotics
> and antiviral agents?
>
> What to Drink for G ood Memory
> A great way to keep your aging memory sharp and avoid Alzheimer's is to
> drink the right stuff.
>
> a. *Tops: Juice*. A glass of any fruit or vegetable juice three times a
> week
> slashed Alzheimer's odds 76% in Vanderbilt University research. Especially
> protective:*blueberry, grape and apple juice*, say other studies.
>
> b. *Tea*: Only a cup of black or green tea a week cut rates of cognitive
> decline in older people by 37%, reports the Alzheimer's Association. Only
> brewed tea works. Skip bottled tea, which is devoid of antioxidants.
>
> c. *Caffeine beverages*. Surprisingly, caffeine fights memory loss and
> Alzheimer's, suggest dozens of studies. Best sources: coffee (one
> Alzheimer's researcher drinks five cups a day), tea and chocolate. Beware
> caffeine if you are pregnant, have high blood pressure, insomnia or
> anxiety.
>
>
> d. *Red wine:* If you drink alcohol, a little red wine is most apt to
> benefit your
> aging brain. It's high in antioxidants. Limit it to one daily glass for
> women,
> two for men. Excessive alcohol, notably binge drinking, brings on
> Alzheimer's.
>
> e. Two to *avoid: Sugary soft drinks*, especially those sweetened with high
> fructose corn syrup. They make lab animals dumb. Water with high copper
> content also can up your odds of Alzheimer's. Use a water filter that
> removes excess minerals.
>
> 5 Ways to Save Your Kids from Alzheimer's Now
> Alzheimer's isn't just a disease that starts in old age. What happens to
> your
> child's brain seems to have a dramatic impact on his or her likelihood of
> Alzheimer's many decades later.
>
> Here are five things you can do now to help save your child from
> Alzheimer's
> and memory loss later in life, according to the latest research.
>
> 1. *Prevent head blows*: Insist your child wear a helmet during biking,
> skating,
> skiing, baseball, football, hockey, and all contact sports. A major blow as
> well
> as tiny repetitive unnoticed concussions can cause damage, leading to
> memory
> loss and Alzheimer's years later.
>
> 2 *Encourage language skills*: A teenage girl who is a superior writer is
> eight
> times more likely to escape Alzheimer's in late life than a teen with poor
> linguistic skills. Teaching young children to be fluent in two or more
> languages
> makes them less vulnerable to Alzheimer's.
>
> 3. *Insist your child go to college*: *Education is a powerful Alzheimer's
> deterrent*. The more years of formal schooling, the lower the odds. Most
> Alzheimer's prone: teenage drop outs. For each year of education, your risk
> of dementia drops 11%, says a recent University of Cambridge study.
>
> 4. *Provide stimulation*: Keep your child's brain busy with physical,
> mental
> and
> social activities and novel experiences. All these contribute to a bigger,
> better functioning brain with more so-called 'cognitive reserve.' High
> cognitive
> reser ve protects against memory decline and Alzheimer's.
>
> 5. *Spare the junk food*: *Lab animals raised on berries, spinach and high
> omega-3 fish have great memories in old age*. Those overfed sugar,
> especially high fructose in soft drinks, saturated fat and trans fats
> become
> overweight and diabetic, with smaller brains and impaired memories as they
> age, a prelude to Alzheimer's.
>
> Excerpted from Jean Carper's newest book:
> "100 Simple Things You Can Do to Prevent Alzheimer's"
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
> --
> Terese
>
>
>
>
>
>
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-- 
Danny Gutierrez
engagecoffee.com
916-548-0945
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