[Homeroast] Resting coffees after roast

Ed Needham roast at homeroaster.com
Tue Aug 24 17:04:19 CDT 2010


Lighter beans still contain more of the volatiles, the flavenoids, the
fruity acids, the sugars.  They will mute over time until the staling
process overrides the muting.  Darker roasts have burned away more of these
components and carbon is pretty stable (grin).
Roasted coffee beans do change over time, and based on personal preference,
level of roast, individual varietals, it only makes sense that there will be
a 'sweet spot' for beans at different times out of the roaster.  I
personally like the beans at roast time for their dancing flavors and
liveliness most often, but I have tasted beans at a week that were very
nutty, smooth and mellow.  The right out of the roaster tastes and smells
are pretty much why I homeroast and don't buy beans at the local
coffeehouses.
*********************
Ed Needham
"to absurdity and beyond!"
http://www.homeroaster.com
*********************

----- Original Message ----- 
From: "Doug Hoople" <doughoople at gmail.com>
To: "A list to discuss home coffee roasting. There are rules for this
list,available at http://www.sweetmarias.com/maillistinfo.html"
<homeroast at lists.sweetmariascoffee.com>
Sent: Tuesday, March 23, 2010 6:30 PM
Subject: Re: [Homeroast] Resting coffees after roast


>I might add here the observation that darker roasts are "ready" earlier
>than
> lighter roasts.
>
> One of the possible reasons is that the "bright" flavors appear to be
> "brightest" just out of the roaster. In some cases with bright, acidic
> coffee, lightly roast, that might just set your teeth on edge it's so
> bright.
>
> When the volatiles combine with the natural acidity of the bean and the
> higher acidity of lighter roasts, blowing off the volatiles by resting a
> few
> days to tone things down a little makes a lot of sense.
>
> Darker roasts appear to mute the high, bright notes, and so are ready
> earlier.
>
> Does any of this make sense?
>
> Doug
>
> On Mon, Mar 22, 2010 at 10:01 PM, Bob Hazen <peatmonster at comcast.net>
> wrote:
>
>> My mileage >is< different!  (grin)
>>
>> I have had great coffee with beans still warm from the roaster.  That's
>> often when drifty, volatile flavors are alive never to be seen again.
>> With
>> a coffee where this is most evident, I notice a drop in flavor at about
>> 1-2
>> days, then it peaks with low notes (minus the volatiles) at 3-4 days
>> where
>> it starts a decline.
>>
>> It has been quite interesting to taste the different flavors at various
>> ages.  I hesitate to embrace any rules of thumb, only that the flavors
>> are
>> time dependent.  It's worth defying conventional wisdom and cupping some
>> young coffees.
>>
>> Bob
>>
>>
>>
>>> And I can't think of anyone that says drink the coffee immediately after
>>> roasting. The recommendations I've heard are to let it rest, sometimes
>>> at
>>> least 48 hours before it's really drinkable.
>>>
>>> My roasts increase their flavor from 24 hours out to almost a week,
>>> sometimes longer. I've never had a roast last longer than 10 days or so
>>> and
>>> I can't say what happens after that.
>>>
>>> Your mileage may vary.
>>>
>>> Frank
>>>
>>
>>
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