[Homeroast] aluminum for roasting

Joseph Robertson theotherjo at gmail.com
Mon Apr 12 15:13:05 CDT 2010


Nice points of information mike.
I heard that we consume a regular about on a daily basis some time ago. I'm
most interested in limiting it in all forms as much as possible.
I personally can't accept something for my body just because it's impossible
to eliminate it totally. Mercury is another heavy metal that is very
difficult to remove once it is absorbed by the body. I am opting to remove
my mercury fillings. Probably won't help me enjoy coffee any more but it
will make me feel better to know they are no longer in my teeth.
Cheers,

Joseph



On Mon, Apr 12, 2010 at 12:58 PM, Mike Koenig <koenig.mike at gmail.com> wrote:

> A few points on Aluminum (or Aluminium if you are so inclined):
>
> 1.  It is the 3rd most abundant element on the planet, so avoiding it in
> your diet is nearly impossible.  You get between 2-25 mg/day just by eating
> normal food, which far exceeds any exposure you may get from your coffee
> equipment.
>
> 2.  Uncoated Aluminum surfaces quickly form a layer of Aluminum oxide which
> is remarkably stable and prevents solutions (such as water or coffee) from
> attacking the metallic layer underneath.   The only way you MAY get some
> aluminum dissolving in water (or coffee, beer or whatnot)  is to scour the
> surface, then quickly expose it to the solution before the oxide layer has
> a
> chance to form.
>
> 3.  The link between Aluminum intake from diet and Alzheimers is not widely
> accepted (except by internet fearmongers), and even the Alzheimer's Society
> states that there is no correlation, especially given the large amount
> consumed on a daily basis in a normal diet in most of the population.
>
> That being said,  I once used an Aluminum rod for a drum roaster on my
> Grill, and found that it would bend if I let the grill get too hot,  so
> maybe it's not the ideal metal for use in roasters.
>
> --mike
>
>
>
>
> On Mon, Apr 12, 2010 at 2:18 PM, Joseph Robertson <theotherjo at gmail.com
> >wrote:
>
> >  I remember the, what I think was inconclusive studies on this.
> Technically
> > speaking I believe Al is considered a heavy metal even though it sounds
> > like
> > an oxymoron. If the metal can enter my system through what ever method. I
> > will steer around using it. Remember the stove top little espresso
> makers?
> > They used to be made only of Al. Now many from Italy are Stainless.
> > Although the Al ones are still sold. I used to look down inside at the
> > decaying Al that looked like an oxidizing mineral decaying soup. Never
> will
> > I go back to and consume any amount of that questionable stuff. Give me
> > good
> > Ole cast iron or stainless.
> > Nice for building some things not food related.
> > Don't mind my rambling memories. Give me a good cup of Joe and who knows
> > what I will ramble on about.????????????? ;)
> > On Mon, Apr 12, 2010 at 9:16 AM, Tom Ulmer <tom at transtate.us> wrote:
> >
> > > For a year or so I used an aluminum WhirlyPop to roast. Besides third
> eye
> > > development I've noticed no ill effects.
> > >
> > > I believe there was news a few years ago which attempted a correlation
> of
> > > aluminum levels in the body to Alzheimer's disease.
> > >
> > > -----Original Message-----
> > > From: homeroast-bounces at lists.sweetmariascoffee.com
> > > [mailto:homeroast-bounces at lists.sweetmariascoffee.com] On Behalf Of
> john
> > > Sent: Monday, April 12, 2010 10:36 AM
> > > To: HomeRoast List
> > > Subject: [Homeroast] aluminum for roasting
> > >
> > > does anyone know if aluminum is a safe metal to have in contact with
> > beans
> > > at roast temperatures?  more specifically, i have an aluminum cookie
> > sheet
> > > that i'd like to use as sheet metal for parts in fabricating a new
> drum.
> > > the drum is cast iron, but i'm thinking of using the aluminum as an
> exit
> > > door for the beans.
> > >
> > > however, if that's safe, it's got me thinking about using a turkey
> frying
> > > pot as a drum.  if it's ok for cookies, is it ok for coffee?  ...would
> be
> > > much higher temperatures.
> > >
> > > thanks,
> > >
> > > -john
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